Was President Trump’s First Speech to Congress True to Life?

In a nutshell, nah.

http://www.cc.com/video-clips/522k1n/the-daily-show-with-trevor-noah-the-real-trump-vs–the-trump-in-front-of-congress
Donald Trump received all kinds of plaudits for his first speech to Congress this week, mainly due to his ability to stay on script and not slip into a furious rant about “Saturday Night Live.” Even those who hate the new president with a fiery passion had to admit he was remarkably composed for a man whose main hobby is raging on Twitter.

While the tone (and his tie) may have been different, though, the substance didn’t seem to change much from his usual pitch. Here are some of his thoughts on the big issues of his campaign and how they stack up to what he’s actually done or plans to do.

POLICE BRUTALITY

What he said:

“[O]ur neglected inner cities will see a rebirth of hope, safety and opportunity.”

What the reality is:

It’s not at all clear that black Americans can count on the Trump administration to ensure their safety. Attorney General Jeff Sessions didn’t even read the Department of Justice’s reports on police violence in Chicago and Ferguson, and he’s pulling back on investigations of the issues. Also, Trump’s insistence on using the phrase “inner city” itself is not only outdated but carries racist undertones.

TAX REFORM

What he said:

“My economic team… will provide massive tax relief for the middle class.”

What the reality is:

Under Trump’s proposed plan, middle-class families may see a reduced tax burden, but the people who really clean up are the top 1%.

TERRORISM

What he said:

“[T]he vast majority of individuals convicted for terrorism-related offenses since 9/11 came here from outside of our country.”

What the reality is:

Trump’s comments are misleading for a number of reasons you can read more about here, but the basic takeaway is this: Security experts agree that homegrown extremism represents a much bigger threat than the one posed by immigration.

LOBBYING REFORM


What he said:

“We have begun to drain the swamp of government corruption by imposing a five-year ban on lobbying by executive branch officials — and a lifetime ban on becoming lobbyists for a foreign government.”

What the reality is:

To put it lightly, it’s a little late. Trump filled his cabinet with people who have deep industry connections. To cite just a few examples, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson ran ExxonMobil, one of the world’s biggest oil company; Secretary of the Treasury Steve Mnuchin was a partner at Goldman Sachs; and EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt is so cozy with oil and gas companies that he once copied and pasted a letter from Devon Energy and sent it to the EPA.

THE ENVIRONMENT

What he said:

“My administration wants to work with members in both parties… to promote clean air and clear water.”

What the reality is:

Trump has already signed an executive order to begin reversing the Obama-era Clean Water Rule. Plus, Pruitt has an extensive record of fighting regulations on air pollutants like mercury and ozone.