DRUNK HISTORY’S MOST BADASS BROADS, PT. 2

Have a drink in honor of these incredible Americans who GOT. S**T. DONE.

Behind every great man is a great woman. Or there’s just a great woman with no man in front of her at all. While plenty of men have been credited with building America, women have had an equal part in shaping the country. And damnit, we should celebrate them. Now, let’s pour one out for these unsung, fearless female heroes.

  • 1. DOROTHY FULDHEIM

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    Seeing kickass journalists like Barbara Walters and Diane Sawyer on the air now seems like no big deal. But that wasn’t the case when Dorothy Fuldheim first sat behind the WEWS news desk in 1947. As the first female news anchor, she interviewed everyone from Pope Pius XII to Albert Einstein, opening the door for lady reporters to come

  • 2. EDITH WILSON

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    Hillary Clinton has a solid chance to become the next President of the United States, but if she wins, she actually won’t be the first woman to run the country. That honor belongs to Woodrow Wilson’s wife, Edith. When Wilson had a stroke, the first lady secretly filled in for him — and did such a good job that no one even noticed. To those who say a woman can’t be president, Edith Wilson says: Been there, done that

  • 3. VIRGINIA HALL

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    What’s the perfect career for a really smart woman who fails the Foreign Service exam but can speak multiple languages? Becoming a superspy, of course. Recruited during World War II, Virginia Hall helped organize the French Resistance, causing all kinds of trouble for the Germans. Women can be war heroes too — they just don’t, like, make a huge deal about it

  • 4. DOLLEY MADISON

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    When the British invaded Washington during the War of 1812, first lady Dolley Madison was left to take care of the White House. Right before the troops came to burn it down, she grabbed the most important valuables, saving major pieces of our country’s history. Dudes may have signed the Declaration of Independence, but it was (one hell of) a woman who saved it