Trevor Noah - Coming Home to the Motherland

Trevor Noah: African American Season 1, Ep 1 02/27/2016 Views: 1,472

Trevor Noah talks about an encounter with a man who was confused about his heritage and ponders the United States' inaccurate labels for different races. (3:09)

I've been doing shows around thecountry.

Around the world really.

I've been blessed.

And I rememberone day I'm in L.A.

and I'm doing a show andwe're sitting backstage

and this comedian comes into the backstage area

and he's got a list of allthe guys that are performing.

And so, he looks aroundand he looks at the

darkest guy in the corner,just the blackest guy

he could find.

And he goes

[comedically]hey, yo.

You the dude from Africa?

[laughter]

And the guy looksup and he's like

[comedically]nah man, I'm from Detroit.

[laughter]

He's like

[comedically]a'ight, my bad.

My bad.

My bad.

Uh, a'ight, uh, yo.

OK, Detroit.

Yeah, yeah.

You--oh, a'ight, OK cool.

L.A.

OK, cool.

Cool.

Cool.

[normal speaking voice]And then he looks at me

for a second, does aquick calculation.

And he's like oh, a'ight,a'ight, um, yeah.

[laughter]

And then helooks and he goes

[comedically]yo, where you from man?

[normal voice] I saidI'm from South Africa.

He's like

[comedically]oh, oh, oh.

You the dude?

[laughter]

Oh damn, man.

Damn.

A'ight.

Yo, I didn't evenknow they got--yo,

you the dude from Africa?

[laughter]

Man, didn'teven know they got

light-skinned [bleep]out there, man.

[laughter]

Damn.

A'ight.

Yo.

Yo.

That's themotherland, man.

That's the motherland.

[normal voice] And all ofa sudden he just started

giving me this speech.

He's like

[comedically] man, you know,yo man, that's--yo man,

that's where wegotta be, man.

That's, you know--

[laughter]

--that's the motherlandout there, man.

Yeah.

I gots to getout there, man.

I gots to.

Yo, I gots togo home, man.

[laughter]

You heard?

I gots to go home.

Man, you tell them.

A'ight?

You tell 'em.

You tell them I'mcoming home, a'ight?

[laughter]

[normal speaking voice]And I was like

[laughs] we're not waiting.

[laughter]

' Cause I'm just--I'm fascinate--I think

that's come--that whole identity has come

from the term African-American .

This is something that'sfascinated me.

You know, it's thevery loose term.

African-American.

'Cause half of the timeyou use it for people that

aren't even African.

You know?

Just use it longas you're black.

They go African-American.

But it's--what if peoplearen't from Africa?

They stillAfrican-American?

Those people from the Caribbean,from Haiti, from Jamaica.

You know?

They call--

[comedically] yeah,African-America.

Guys like

[Jamaican accent] no man,I come from Jamaica.

I no' from Africa.

[laughter]

I ain't neverbeen there 'fore, man.

[comedically] He'slike you wanna stay?

[Jamaican accent]African-American, man.

Hey.

[laughter, applause]

[normal voice] The prefixto American has become as

important as American itself.

I thought it was justAmerican but it's not.

No, no, no.

It's very importantyou have the prefix.

You know, you haveAfrican-American.

African-American.

You have otherslike Latin-

or Mexican-American.

You have Asian-American.

You have--the mostinteresting for me was

Indian-American which I learnedabout during Thanksgiving.

Indian-American.

And then I was told I'm nolonger allowed to say this.

Said I now have tosay Native American.

Which is redundant,is it not?

[laughter]

Because if somebody'sa native of the land

they're still in shouldyou not then just

call them American?

[laughter]

How does that work?

[laughter continues,applause]